• Fall 2021 Issue •

 

Rowdy Mermaid: A study in disruption.

In the closing lines of the Preface to The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money, John Maynard Keynes discusses his work as "a long struggle" to "escape from habitual modes of thought and expression" (xvi-xvii). There's an implication in Keynes' work that it is also the chore of the reader to escape from old ideas and embrace what his text calls "the forces which determine change" (xvi). Many twenty-first-century entrepreneurs may recognize Keynes' romantic musing as the type of divergent thinking praised in corporate circles. Equally discussed in those circles is the disruptive … [Read More...] about Rowdy Mermaid: A study in disruption.

An Insider’s Perspective on an Outsiders’ Medium

What is a "Zine" and Why do People Make Them? People commonly ask me these questions when I mention zines.  Though I’ve personally made eighteen zines over the past twenty years, I feel barely qualified to provide an answer. The short and very incomplete answer is that a zine is like a cross between a personal letter and an amateur magazine.  The longer answer is that zines have been around since about 1930 as science fiction “fanzines” (Duncombe 11) and have evolved over time to encompass … [Read More...] about An Insider’s Perspective on an Outsiders’ Medium

How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative

We are spending more time indoors and online. But recent studies suggest that nature can help our brains and bodies to stay healthy. I’ve been an avid hiker my whole life. From the time I first strapped on a backpack and headed into the Sierra Nevada Mountains, I was hooked on the experience, loving the way being in nature cleared my mind and helped me to feel more grounded and peaceful. But, even though I’ve always believed that hiking in nature had many psychological benefits, I’ve never … [Read More...] about How Nature Can Make You Kinder, Happier, and More Creative

Seán Michael Wilson & “The Minamata Story”

Though book-length comics and comic anthologies go back over a century, most pundits of the genre agree that the modern era of the graphic novel begins in 1986 with DC Comics' release of Watchmen and Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (Weiner). For those who study graphic novels as literature, the breakthrough publication of that year was Art Spiegelman's graphic novel Maus I. "This account of the Holocaust, with Jews portrayed as mice and Nazis as cats, was based on the experiences of Spiegelman’s … [Read More...] about Seán Michael Wilson & “The Minamata Story”

Simple Practices to Light Your Creative Fire & Keep it Burning

The winter I completed "Creative Fire," my largest painting to date, I was working in Southern Spain.  My studio was situated on the third floor of our 100-year-old town house in Loja.  It is big, ramshackle and cold, very cold.  The roof leaked, and, despite being freezing in winter, it could be impossibly hot in summer.  It had a gentle spirit, as if the age of the house had infused the space with benign patience. It was quiet enough for me to focus, yet I felt accompanied by the chirruping of … [Read More...] about Simple Practices to Light Your Creative Fire & Keep it Burning

The Nausea of Craft

I sit at my desk. It is night, and my laptop glows with a pale, blank page.  Books surround me, along with notes from a recent craft talk by a writer I admire. I ’m organized, on top of it, prepared to write.  But my anxiety rises, and I feel queasy.  I’m upset, off-balance, paralyzed.  To distract myself, I open email, peek at Twitter, get up to make tea—anything to escape the vertiginous page.  I have the nausea of craft. In his novel, Nausea, Jean-Paul Sartre described existential nausea … [Read More...] about The Nausea of Craft

Join The Conversation . . .

The Riverside Quarterly is the newest journal to join the global dialogue on the art & practice of creativity.  Though we publish quarterly, we accept articles on a rolling basis throughout the year.  If your interested in publishing your ideas, or would like to join the conversation, but are unsure where to begin, we'd like to hear from you.  Read our Submissions Page for more information.